Old Bog Garden Gets New Life

Dr. Patrick Dickinson presents a plan for renovation of the bog garden. Photo: KCMGA.
Dr. Patrick Dickinson presents a plan for renovation of the bog garden. Photo: KCMGA.

Problems plagued the Bog Garden from the beginning. Water did not percolate through the bog fast enough to offset flooding. Some plants were more aggressive than expected and had to be constantly pruned or divided. Others did not do as well as expected in the bog and required replacement. 

The drainage problems had no simple answer. Photo: KCMGA.
The drainage problems had no simple answer. Photo: KCMGA.
Bog garden in February of 2010. The hybiscus has gotten out of control. Photo: KCMGA.
Bog garden in February of 2010. The hybiscus has gotten out of control. Photo: KCMGA.
Bog garden in March of 2012. The plants installed to replace hibiscus and other large plants failed to thrive, leaving a bare look. Photo: KCMGA.
Bog garden in March of 2012. The plants installed to replace hibiscus and other large plants failed to thrive, leaving a bare look. Photo: KCMGA.

 After much research and discussion, it was decided to replace the bog garden with some kind of feature that would be less difficult to maintain. The Texas A&M Agrilife Dallas Water University team suggested a waterless feature., which sounds confusing. Dr. Dickinson explained that it would look like a rock-lined stream, especially when the sun shines on it. It’s actually made up of small glass pellets. They come in a variety of colors and are used in this kind of feature and as mulch.

Check out how we did this project in “Bog Garden Make Over Yields a Waterless Water Feature.”

The new waterless feature immediately after planting. Photo: KCMGA.
The new waterless feature immediately after planting. Photo: KCMGA.

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